Ari Honarvar and Cameron Powers Project Band members present:

Building Musical and Poetry Bridges in the U.S with Rumi

At a time when anti-Muslim and anti-refugee sentiments is spreading across the U.S., Rumi’s poetry is a powerful means of dispelling myths about the Middle East and Islam as being inherently violent. Instead it presents an ancient culture rooted in inclusiveness, kindness and celebration. Musical Ambassadors, partnering with the Iranian American artist and writer, Ari Honarvar, are now bringing Rumi’s poetry into their performances. Their collaboration has created dynamic events featuring songs, poems and stories of Rumi’s life and compelling accounts of a childhood spent in the war.

Ongoing Musical Missions

Musical Ambassadors performances accomplish two goals:
Through the enchanting power of music and poetry, they bring the beauty and the wisdom of the ancient culture of Middle East to the Western audiences.
They provide funds for musical events and workshops for refugee communities in the U.S and abroad.

Thus far the group has performed in over 200 concerts. In 2008 their efforts led to opening Iraqi music schools in the largest Iraqi refugee populations of Syria and Jordan so that Iraqi refugee children could carry forward the ancient microtonal music styles and the ancient poetic lyrics of their civilization.

More recently, the organization sent 40 drums with their Musical Ambassador in Iraqi Kurdistan to provide musical healing therapy for Yazidi women liberated from two years of sexual slavery under ISIL.

The neighboring refugee camps have begun inquiring: “Where are our drums? Where is our Musical Ambassador?”

Help them build bridges.

Learn about becoming a Musical Ambassador

How To Become A Reverse Missionary

For the past 20 years, Musical Ambassadors of Peace have been traveling to countries that have received unfavorable press coverage in the Western media. They study the indigenous music and the language of the country to build musical bridges.

Building Bridges Across War-torn Borders

Soon after the American-led invasion, Musical Ambassadors, armed with an oud and Iraqi love songs, traveled to Iraq and began to play and sing in the streets of Baghdad. The Iraqi crowd who up to that point had mostly encountered U.S. military and military contractors finally saw a different side of America. The group soon became known as “Reverse Missionaries,” for their mission, rather than preaching, was to listen to the Iraqis. Since then, they have traveled to Syria, Egypt and Iran taking with them the gift of music and bringing back people’s stories and concerns.

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